Is the European Union doomed to repeat its past humanitarian mistakes when dealing with migration?

By László Molnárfi (Adapted from an essay for Geography), EEB1, S7HUA. With careless ease, the Greek and Turkish authorities have treated stranded migrants as pawns of a chessboard on the stage of international world politics, resulting in atrocities along the border. On the verge of this new crisis, it is up to those in charge, such as leaders of the European Union, to act humanely. In the past, this has not always happened to the fullest possible extent. By studying past mistakes, such as the 2015 European migrant crisis, perhaps humanity can do better in the future. So, what is the way forward for European leaders on dealing with this crisis, and what were these past mistakes?

Boskanter – Disconnecting and Reconnecting

Living an eco-friendly lifestyle in a home called Boskanter: A very small, humble and modest house; a bit rudimentary looking to the outsider, who has just left his modern apartment in downtown Brussels. Inside we meet some of the other inhabitants and are immediately sucked into their feeling of community – wrapped by an authentic feeling of homeliness, belonging and safety.

Euroschool students, let’s have a debate! – A call to promote debating in the European Schools

By Lucas Bonhomme Vazquez, EEB1, S7ENA.  Whether it be representing Bolivia at school-organised MUNs, watching Peterson vs Zizek on YouTube, a pleasant classroom discussion initiated by your teacher or sitting on your favourite couch while spooning gluten-free vanilla ice-cream while the latest … Read More

Can the courts save us?

For young people desperately looking to world leaders to properly deal with the climate crisis, there was a lot of optimism and media coverage around the 2015 Paris Agreement. However, it fell short of being a decisive step that would have enabled courts to take legal action to mitigate climate change.